Anonymous v. Big Media v. .gov

January 19, 2012 - 5:54 pm
Irradiated by LabRat
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Seems today federal prosecutors shut down Megaupload, which theoretically has nothing to do with SOPA/PIPA except thematically but certainly is timed “well”.

In response, Anonymous has shut down the Justice Department’s website. Also Universal Music, the MPAA home site, RIAA, Warner Music Group, a music licensing site, the US. Copyright department, and a few other sites I don’t recognize and obviously can’t access right now. You can watch Anonymous’s feed for the operation, as well as the speed for which #opmegaupload is trending.

Whether Anonymous is right or wrong (they’re usually some mix of both), it’s fascinating to watch, particularly the sheer speed with which coordination happens and the number of different languages being used to spread the word. No wonder dictatorships are afraid of Twitter and Facebook.

No Responses to “Anonymous v. Big Media v. .gov”

  1. SayUncle » tit for tat Says:

    […] shuts down file sharing site. Anonymous shuts down DOJ and entertainment type sites. It is interesting to […]

  2. Old NFO Says:

    Interesting is right :-)

  3. Sigivald Says:

    I disapprove of Anonymous’ Brownshirt tactics, even if the occasionally/often oppose things I also oppose.

    “We think that is wrong, do not do that or we’ll vote against you/not buy your products/tell everyone how much you suck” is fine, and notionally “democratic”, in that it allows the people to make their decisions.

    “We think that is wrong, so we’re going to use brute force to shut you down because we feel like it” is not, no matter what people’ve claimed about “internet democracy”.

    If the State shuts down Megaupload and we don’t like it, we can vote them out of office.

    If Anonymous shuts down anything, we can’t do jack about it.

    Terror tactics. Uancceptable.

  4. LabRat Says:

    I have no admiration for Anonymous. It’s a mob, and in a virtual sense a violent one.

    It’s more accurate to say I enjoy seeing the usual power monopolies in a place where they are relatively helpless when their usual subjects decide to object.

  5. Andrew S Says:

    Sigivald, I generally agree with you but with one important exception: There’s no point in voting anymore. Nobody represents us. All politicians are bought and paid for corporate stooges. When there’s no legal remedy, the extralegal becomes the only way to protest.

  6. Sigivald Says:

    Corporate stooges. No representation. Right.

    Thus the way they’re dropping SOPA like a hot potato?

    (And, note, not because some jerks DDOSed a few websites.)

    Hollywood has more influence than Google, so I don’t think it’s just that they got “bought” by a different side.

    No, sorry, the “they’re owned by The Evil Corporations so we have no power” bit never worked, still doesn’t. Believing it does make you powerless, though, since if you never try to exercise political power you really won’t have any.

    It’s a common and easy trope, but the evidence actually supports it very, very poorly.

    (Which corporate interest is it that bought dropping the Keystone pipeline… ?

    Oh, they’re beholden to interests, all right. But they’re voting blocs and core constituencies, not corporations.)

  7. Phelps Says:

    I have no admiration for Anonymous.

    I sure love when one group of criminals turns on another group of criminals, though.

  8. Stingray Says:

    Call me crazy, but methinks the truth might just be somewhere between Sigivald and Andrew.

  9. Tam Says:

    Really, watching a bunch of hackers square off against lobbyists and the DOJ is like watching Enemy At The Gates: No matter who gets shot in the head, you’re a winner! :D